Maclean Evangelical Church

cross-sphere-logo-Copy.jpgWe are an evangelical church in Maclean. We value learning the Bible together, we desire to glorify God, and are choosing to be a loving and joyful church.

God has been so good to us.

We meet at 5:00 p.m. in the CWA hall on the main street in Maclean (40 River St near the Post Office roundabout)  Click for Google Map You are welcomed to stay for a meal after the service.

Contact: Rev Andrew Groves (02) 6647 6658

Also check us out or ‘Like’ on FACEBOOK
https://www.facebook.com/MacleanEvangelicalChurch

BIBLE TALKS can be found on the ‘Bible Talks Page’ or from the sidebar. (Current talks are on Matthew’s gospel)
https://macleanevangelicalchurch.wordpress.com/bible-talks/

More about our church and our beliefs can be found below https://macleanevangelicalchurch.wordpress.com/about/

Affiliation: Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches www.fiec.org.au

sunset

Marriage–Scriptural bookends

Scripture begins with a marriage (Adam and Eve), and it ends with a marriage (Christ and his church)—and the former is the trailer for the latter. The joining together of the man and woman is a picture of how heaven and earth will one day be joined together through the union of Jesus and his people.

Source: Sam Allberry, How Celibacy Can Fulfill Your Sexuality August 26, 2016

https://www.thegospelcoalition.org/article/how-celibacy-can-fulfill-your-sexuality

Loneliness replaced by a crowd – tomorrow night

I just read Psalm 142 which was written by David when he was in the cave (clearly not a comfortable providence).

He describes his troubles saying: “A place to flee to has perished from me; no one is concerned for me.”

He is alone in his troubles – but recognizing that God will deliver him … he sees into the future and says “The righteous will encircle around me, for you will deal bountifully with me.”

In other words, one day people will surround him, listening to him and then joyfully praising God for his delivering his servant as recounted by the sufferer.

I was struck by how he imagines his present loneliness being replaced by many people rejoicing with him – reminds me of tomorrow night!

John Calvin on Christian Suffering

I am almost 50% through my first reading of Calvin’s Institutes. I should have done this years ago! Below is a section from Calvin’s discussion of Christian suffering. I have highlighted the bits that ‘grab’ me.

John Calvin, Institutes,
Book 3, Chapter 8 – Bearing the Cross, A Part of Self-denial

1. Christ’s cross and ours

But it behooves the godly mind to climb still higher, to the height to which Christ calls his disciples: that each must bear his own cross [Matt. 16:24]. For whomever the Lord has adopted and deemed worthy of his fellowship ought to prepare themselves for a hard, toilsome, and unquiet life, crammed with very many and various kinds of evil. It is the Heavenly Father’s will thus to exercise them so as to put his own children to a definite test. Beginning with Christ, his first-born, he follows this plan with all his children. For even though that Son was beloved above the rest, and in him the Father’s mind was well pleased [Matt. 3:17 and 17:5], yet we see that far from being treated indulgently or softly, to speak the truth, while he dwelt on earth he was not only tried by a perpetual cross but his whole life was nothing but a sort of perpetual cross. The apostle notes the reason: that it behooved him to “learn obedience through what he suffered” [Heb. 5:8].

Why should we exempt ourselves, therefore, from the condition to which Christ our Head had to submit, especially since he submitted to it for our sake to show us an example of patience in himself? Therefore, the apostle teaches that God has destined all his children to the end that they be conformed to Christ [Rom. 8:29]. Hence also in harsh and difficult conditions, regarded as adverse and evil, a great comfort comes to us: we share Christ’s sufferings in order that as he has passed from a labyrinth of all evils into heavenly glory, we may in like manner be led through various tribulations to the same glory [Acts 14:22]. So Paul himself elsewhere states: when we come to know the sharing of his sufferings, we at the same time grasp the power of his resurrection; and when we become like him in his death, we are thus made ready to share his glorious resurrection [Phil. 3:10-11]. How much can it do to soften all the bitterness of the cross, that the more we are afflicted with adversities, the more surely our fellowship with Christ is confirmed! By communion with him the very sufferings themselves not only become blessed to us but also help much in promoting our salvation.

2. The cross leads us to perfect trust in God’s power

Besides this, our Lord had no need to undertake the bearing of the cross except to attest and prove his obedience to the Father. But as for us, there are many reasons why we must pass our lives under a continual cross. First, as we are by nature too inclined to attribute everything to our flesh-unless our feebleness be shown, as it were, to our eyes-we readily esteem our virtue above its due measure. And we do not doubt, whatever happens, that against all difficulties it will remain unbroken and unconquered. Hence we are lifted up into stupid and empty confidence in the flesh; and relying on it, we are then insolently proud against God himself, as if our own powers were sufficient without his grace.

He can best restrain this arrogance when he proves to us by experience not only the great incapacity but also the frailty under which we labor. Therefore, he afflicts us either with disgrace or poverty, or bereavement, or disease, or other calamities. Utterly unequal to bearing these, in so far as they touch us, we soon succumb to them. Thus humbled, we learn to call upon his power, which alone makes us stand fast under the weight of afflictions. But even the most holy persons, however much they may recognize that they stand not through their own strength but through God’s grace, are too sure of their own fortitude and constancy unless by the testing of the cross he bring them into a deeper knowledge of himself. This complacency even stole upon David: “In my tranquillity I said, ‘I shall never be moved.’ O Jehovah, by thy favor thou hadst established strength for my mountain; thou didst hide thy face, I was dismayed” [Ps. 30:6-7].’ For he confesses that in prosperity his senses had been so benumbed with sluggishness that, neglecting God’s grace, upon which he ought to have depended, he so relied upon himself as to promise himself he could ever stand fast. If this happened to so great a prophet, what one of us should not be afraid and take care?

In peaceful times, then, they preened themselves on their great constancy and patience, only to learn when humbled by adversity that all this was hypocrisy. Believers, warned, I say, by such proofs of their diseases, advance toward humility and so, sloughing off perverse confidence in the flesh, betake themselves to God’s grace. Now when they have betaken themselves there they experience the presence of a divine power in which they have protection enough and to spare.

3. The cross permits us to experience God’s faithfulness and gives us hope for the future

And this is what Paul teaches: “Tribulations produce patience; and patience, tried character” [Rom. 5:3-4, cf. Vg.]. That God has promised to be with believers in tribulation [cf. II Cor. 1:4] they experience to be true, while, supported by his hand, they patiently endure-an endurance quite unattainable by their own effort. The saints, therefore, through forbearance experience the fact that God, when there is need, provides the assistance that he has promised. Thence, also, is their hope strengthened, inasmuch as it would be the height of ingratitude not to expect that in time to come God’s truthfulness will be as constant and firm as they have already experienced it to be. Now we see how many good things, interwoven, spring from the cross. For, overturning that good opinion which we falsely entertain concerning our own strength, and unmasking our hypocrisy, which affords us delight, the cross strikes at our perilous confidence in the flesh. It teaches us, thus humbled, to rest upon God alone, with the result that we do not faint or yield. Hope, moreover, follows victory in so far as the Lord, by performing what he has promised, establishes his truth for the time to come. Even if these were the only reasons, it plainly appears how much we need the practice of bearing the cross. And it is of no slight importance for you to be cleansed of your blind love of self that you may be made more nearly aware of your incapacity; to feel your own incapacity that you may learn to distrust yourself; to distrust yourself that you may transfer your trust to God; to rest with a trustful heart in God that, relying upon his help, you may persevere unconquered to the end; to take your stand in his grace that you may comprehend the truth of his promises; to have unquestioned certainty of his promises that your hope may thereby be strengthened.

4. The cross trains us to patience and obedience

The Lord also has another purpose for afflicting his people: to test their patience and to instruct them to obedience. Not that they can manifest any other obedience to him save what he has given them. But it so pleases him by unmistakable proofs to make manifest and clear the graces which he has conferred upon the saints, that these may not lie idle, hidden within. Therefore, by bringing into the open the power and constancy to forbear, with which he has endowed his servants, he is said to test their patience. From this arise those expressions: that God tried Abraham, and proved his piety from the fact that he did not refuse to sacrifice his one and only son [Gen. 22:1,12]. Therefore, Peter likewise teaches that our faith is proved by tribulations as gold is tested in a fiery furnace [I Peter 1:7]. For who would say it is not expedient that the most excellent gift of patience, which the believer has received from his God, be put to use that it may be certain and manifest? Nor will men otherwise ever esteem it as it deserves.

But if God himself does right in providing occasion to stir up those virtues which he has conferred upon his believers in order that they may not be hidden in obscurity-nay, lie useless and pass away-the afflictions of the saints, without which they would have no forbearance, are amply justified. They are also, I assert, instructed by the cross to obey, because thus they are taught to live not according to their own whim but according to God’s will. Obviously, if everything went according to their own liking, they would not know what it is to follow God. And Seneca recalls that it was an old proverb, in exhorting any man to endure adversities, to say, “Follow God.” By this the ancients hinted, obviously, that a man truly submitted to God’s yoke only when he yielded his hand and back to His rod. But if it is most proper that we should prove ourselves obedient to our Heavenly Father in all things, we must surely not refuse to have him accustom us in every way to render obedience to him.

5. The cross as medicine

Still we do not see how necessary this obedience is to us unless we consider at the same time how great is the wanton impulse of our flesh to shake off God’s yoke if we even for a moment softly and indulgently treat that impulse. For the same thing happens to it that happens to mettlesome horses. If they are fattened in idleness for some days, they cannot afterward be tamed for their high spirits; nor do they recognize their rider, whose command they previously obeyed. And what God complains of in the Israelites is continually in us: fattened and made flabby, we kick against him who has fed and nourished us [Deut. 32:15]. Indeed, God’s beneficence ought to have allured us to esteem and love his goodness. But inasmuch as our ill will is such that we are, instead, repeatedly corrupted by his indulgence, it is most necessary that we be restrained by some discipline in order that we may not jump into such wantonness. Thus, lest in the unmeasured abundance of our riches we go wild; lest, puffed up with honors, we become proud; lest, swollen with other good things- either of the soul or of the body, or of fortune-we grow haughty, the Lord himself, according as he sees it expedient, confronts us and subjects and restrains our unrestrained flesh with the remedy of the cross. And this he does in various ways in accordance with what is healthful for each man. For not all of us suffer in equal degree from the same diseases or, on that account, need the same harsh cure. From this it is to be seen that some are tried by one kind of cross, others by another. But since the heavenly physician treats some more gently but cleanses others by harsher remedies, while he wills to provide for the health of all, he yet leaves no one free and untouched, because he knows that all, to a man, are diseased.

6. The cross as fatherly chastisement

Besides this, it is needful that our most merciful Father should not only anticipate our weakness but also often correct past transgressions so that he may keep us in lawful obedience to himself. Accordingly, whenever we are afflicted, remembrance of our past life ought immediately to come to mind; so we shall doubtless find that we have committed something deserving this sort of chastisement. And yet, exhortation to forbearance is not to be based principally upon the recognition of sin. For Scripture furnishes a far better conception when it says that the Lord chastens us by adversities “so that we may not be condemned along with the world” [I Cor. 11:32]. Therefore, also, in the very harshness of tribulations we must recognize the kindness and generosity of our Father toward us, since he does not even then cease to promote our salvation. For he afflicts us not to ruin or destroy us but, rather, to free us from the condemnation of the world. That thought will lead us to what Scripture teaches in another place: “My son, do not despise the Lord’s discipline, or grow weary when he reproves you. For whom God loves, he rebukes, and embraces as a father his son” [Prov. 3:11-12 p.]. When we recognize the Father’s rod, is it not our duty to show ourselves obedient and teachable children rather than, in arrogance, to imitate desperate men who have become hardened in their evil deeds? When we have fallen away from him, God destroys us unless by reproof he recalls us. Thus he rightly says that if we are without discipline we are illegitimate children, not sons [Heb. 12:8]. We are, then, most perverse if when he declares his benevolence to us and the care that he takes for our salvation, we cannot bear him. Scripture teaches that this is the difference between unbelievers and believers: the former, like slaves of inveterate and double-dyed wickedness, with chastisement become only worse and more obstinate. But the latter, like freeborn sons, attain repentance. Now you must choose in which group you would prefer to be numbered. But since we have spoken concerning this matter elsewhere, content with a brief reference, I shall stop here.

 

The Testing of Christ

Miscellaneous thoughts on the passage this Sunday.

Jesus was led BY THE SPIRIT into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil.

Jesus’ human nature felt hunger.

Jesus is the New Israel (out of Egypt, through the waters, 40 periods in wilderness etc.)

Israel in wilderness (1) no bread – murmured – doubted God’s PROVISION as Father (2) entry into Canaan – God will not save us – doubted God’s PROTECTION as Father (3) worship of the golden calf – doubted God’s GIVING INHERITANCE.

Jesus overcame temptation through resources available to his human nature – God’s word, Prayer, reliance on the Spirit. He felt the full force of temptation on his human nature (because he did not give in early)

Jesus overcame what Adam and Eve did not – Lust of the flesh (Good for food), Lust of the eyes (good to the eye fruit/kingdoms), Pride of life (wisdom/angels will save) – see 1Jn 2:16.

Jesus is a second Adam whose obedience is credited to those who belong to him.

Behold the angels came and served him food. Psalm 91 is true of the faithful man.

Up into the WILDERNESS, set on the pinnacle of the TEMPLE, taken to a VERY HIGH MOUNTAIN – three eschatological locations of increasing altitude

The devil quoted Psalm 91 to Jesus about angels not letting him fall but left off the next verse about his crushing the serpent underfoot.

John the Baptizer

In Isaiah 39 God speaks of Israel’s judgment and exile. Then in Isaiah 40 God speaks of comforting his people by his coming in the wilderness to reveal his glory and character. Before he comes there will be ‘a voice’ in the wilderness calling people to make drastic preparations for God’s coming – described in terms of poetic road works filling in valleys and removing mountains.

In Matthew 3, after four hundred years, the silence is broken by ‘a voice’ in the wilderness saying, “Thus says the LORD” – John the Baptizer. Like Elijah he called on Israel to repent for God’s rule was coming.

And then God appeared … but not in all his divine majestic power riding the storm clouds through the wilderness – rather a plain ordinary Jewish man walking down from the hill – “God-in-the-flesh” – Jesus.

John said he would baptize with Spirit and fire but when he was baptized (in obedience to his Father’s will that he identify himself with sinners) – the Spirit came upon him like a dove.

Why a dove? It has echoes of new creation (from Genesis 1 and Noah’s flood) … but also of gentleness and meekness. Isaiah’s God – God-in-the-flesh – baptizer with Spirit and fire – gentle and meek towrd brusied reeds and smouldering wicks.

Two quotes:

Every time we say, “I believe in the Holy Spirit,” we mean that we believe that there is a living God able and willing to enter human personality and change it. – J. B. Phillips

The Holy Spirit destroys my personal private life and turns it into a thoroughfare for God. – Oswald Chambers (1874-1917)

www.esvbible.org/Matthew+3

This insect was highly prized as nourishment, either in water and salt like our prawns, or dried in the sun and preserved in honey and vinegar, or powdered and mixed with wheat flour into a pancake.